5
By Allison Hazlett-Rose
Oct 30, 2015 09:42 AM EST

Room Theatrical Review

Room is a brilliant and poignant piece of film making, the movie is thought provoking and relevant.  Practically borrowing from recent years headlines, the story reminds us to keep our kids close and treasure every moment we have with them.
Room Theatrical Review
Purchase  Blu-ray | Digital HD
Room. A ten foot by ten foot space.  A bed, sink, toilet, bathtub, wardrobe and small skylight to help differentiate between day and night. And, most importantly, one door to the outside with a keypad lock.  Not nearly enough space for one person let alone two.

Joy (Brie Larson; 21 Jump Street) has spent 7 years locked in this room/shed in the backyard.  Five of those years she shared it with her son, Jack (Jacob Tremblay; The Smurfs 2).  Captive of a man they call "old Nick" (Sean Bridgers; The Best of Me) who Joy attempted to help when she was 17 years old.  Lured away from her family and her freedom, she has spent 7 years as his sexual slave while trying to survive and keep herself and her son alive.

The first half of the film explores Joy's and Jack's daily lives in this room.  Joy makes up stories for Jack as to what could be on the other side (Aliens and space) while seeing to it that his basic needs like hygiene, exercise and some form of education are all met.  The second half delves into how Joy and Jack cope with the real world and going "home".

Larson does an outstanding job of portraying a young woman trying to be strong despite her circumstances, and eventually falling apart once she and Jack are "safe".  Joan Allen (The Bourne Legacy) as Joy's mother displays equal parts the loving woman who has regained her child and guilt ridden woman as she must come to terms with what her daughter has been through the past 7 years.  Tremblay does a good job for someone his age.

Director, Lenny Abrahamson (Frank) uses shading to his advantage, helping the audience to try and understand what it must be like for Jack, so new to the outside world.  His technique of choosing extreme close ups inside the room were very effective in giving a glimpse of the claustrophobic surroundings these characters endured.  While Abrahamson edited the movie down to just under two hours, I was so invested in them that the run time felt inadequately short.

Feelings of fear, sadness and anxiety haunted me form the very beginning of the film and at moments there were audible gasps, ooooohs and awwwwws throughout the audience.  The feeling of discomfort, even after Joy and Jack were rescued, never quite left me and made a lasting impression.  Perhaps, as the mother of two teenage girls, the movie resonated with me in a very real sense, which only served to add to my uneasiness.

Arguably a brilliant and poignant piece of film making, the movie is thought provoking and relevant.  Practically borrowing from recent years headlines, the story reminds us to keep our kids close and treasure every moment we have with them.

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MPAA Rating: R
Running Time: 113 minutes
Distributed By: A24

For more information about Room visit the FlickDirect Movie Database.

About Allison Hazlett-Rose

FlickDirect, Allison  Hazlett-Rose

Allison Hazlett has always had a passion for the arts and uses her organization skills to help keep FlickDirect prosperous. Mrs. Hazlett oversees and supervises the correspondents and critics that are part of the FlickDirect team. Mrs. Hazlett attended Hofstra University where she earned her bachelors degree in communications and is a member of the Florida Film Critics Circle. Read more reviews and content by .

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