Sep 21, 2010 01:50 PM EST

Amish Grace Comes To DVD

Amish Grace Comes To DVD
Forgiveness is a difficult emotion to grasp. It seems simple enough, someone does something that wrongs you somehow and in turn you forgive him or her for said act. Of course when it comes time to actually commit to it, it is much harder to forgive someone for whatever it is they did. Especially when the act is taking another life. It's hard to imagine actually finding it within yourself to forgive the man or woman who took the life of someone close to you. But that is what the movie Amish Grace is about: forgiveness.
 
The movie opens up simply enough; we are introduced to the Garber family. They live the Amish lifestyle forsaking things we take for granted like electricity, cars, computers, and phones, even photographs. For the first 15-20 minutes we get a glimpse of what the core belief behind their way of life is and how they feel this lifestyle will bring them closer to God. Simultaneously we are introduced to Charlie and Anna, a young couple living a few miles up the road. Charlie is the one who picks up the milk from the Amish farmers. We see that Charlie is suffering in some way but for now we don't know what that is. In contrast are the Garber parents who are very happy with each other and their two daughters, Anna and Mary Beth.
 
One day as the girls are sitting down for another day of school when Charlie drives up, walks inside and proceeds to murder the young girls then himself. This is not the type of situation that the Amish folk are used to unlike the rest of the world where sadly it is almost commonplace. From this point we watch as the townsfolk are left to deal with the shock of these tragic events. Not long after the shooting the deacon of the town as well as two of the fathers of the young girls proceeds to Anna's house where they share not only their grief concerning these events but also forgive Charlie for what he has done. Naturally this shocks Anna. How can you forgive someone for committing such a violent and horrific act? What Amish Grace attempts to show us is what true forgiveness is.
 
The performances are quite good considering this wasn't a large Hollywood production. The first few minutes drag a bit as we are introduced to the characters but it's as the events unfold where we see the depth of range of all the actors and actresses in this movie. The picture quality of the DVD isn't so great; the images are a bit fuzzy even for a low budget movie. Thankfully the sound quality is good so you don't spend the movie staining to hear what everyone is saying. There are no special features to speak of other than standard scene selection and Spanish audio. But perhaps that is best, a behind-the-scenes feature might take away from the every of a movie like this.
 
In the end Amish Grace is a good little movie that tugs at the old heartstrings while doing something movies rarely tend to do now a days, teach you a lesson. 

Pick up your copy of Amish Grace on DVD at Amazon.com.



FlickDirect Movie Reviewer, Chris Rebholz
Chris RebholzReviewer
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When Chris was but a wee lad growing up in the slums of suburban New Jersey, he happened to rent a little movie called Tron. Then his head exploded. It was at the moment that he realized that he loved movies, and since then Chris has made it a habit of renting movies, going to the movies, discussing his favorite movies, and anything else in between when it comes to that genre. It has been Chris's passion and hobby for years now and will be for years to come.

Favorite Films: Shawshank RedemptionOriginal Star Wars TrilogyLord of the Rings Trilogy, Blade Runner, Tron, Dune, American Werewolf in London.
Favorite Directors: Martin Scorsese, Christopher Nolan, Kevin Smith, Frank Darabont, Steven Spielberg
Favorite Actors: Christopher Walken, Morgan Freeman, Tom Hanks, Jeff Bridges, Edward Norton
Favorite Genres: ActionComedyDramaSci-fi/Fantasy
Favorite Television: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Bones, CSI, Star Trek: DS9, Star Trek: Next Generation
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