By Allison Skornick-Rose
Jan 16, 2019 01:00 PM EST

Glass Theatrical Review

Shyamalan does what we expect him to do with Glass and it wraps up these storylines though I don’t know if it was worth the 19-year wait.

Glass Theatrical Review
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M. Night Shyamalan (The Sixth Sense) is known for his dramatic thrillers that offer a twist.  He usually keeps the audience guessing as to what is really going on and reveals the truth at the end, often to the surprise of the viewers.  In 2000 he presented fans with a different type of "superhero" story in Unbreakable starring Samuel L. Jackson (The Hateful Eight) and Bruce Willis (Die Hard) and sixteen years later he gave us James McAvoy (Atonement) in Split, a film about a man with multiple personalities and super human strength. This month he ties the two films together with the next installment simply titled Glass.

As the film opens we see Kevin (McAvoy) toying with four teenage cheerleaders while David (Willis) is crusading vigilante style while working with his son, Joseph (Spencer Treat Clark; Animal Kingdom), in their security business.  At the police try to narrow into exactly who the green raincoat "savior" is forces are at work to bring both men to justice.  As David finds Kevin and frees the hostages, they suddenly find themselves surrounded and commandeered to a mental health facility.  I ronically, it is the same facility that is home to Elijah Price/Mr. Glass (Jackson). Here they meet Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson; American Horror Story) who specializes in treating people with delusions of trying to be superheroes.  

Dr. Staple explains that she has the next three days to make these individuals understand that they are not superheroes but simply have some brain damage and astute observation skills making them believe they have superhero like qualities.  As the movie progresses though we come to find out that Mr. Glass, who seems catatonic for the most part, really is very aware and alert and is plotting to execute his plan with the help of Kevin and David.  Ironic and convenient that they all ended up in the same place, isn't it? In the end Elijah gets what he wants and we come to find out that maybe these individuals aren't quite as crazy as they seem and that comic books aren't necessarily all fiction.

The strength of Glass is hands down the cast.  Jackson and Willis already proved they had chemistry 19 years ago and time has not diminished that bond at all it seems.  I previously stated in my review of Split that McAvoy was excellent and talented as he switched from one personality to another so seamlessly and he continues that here with Kevin and his 22 other "characters".  Watching him work is a pleasure and I still believe he should be nominated for an Academy Award for his portrayal of this young man with multiple personalities.  Paulson is the new element in this group but she fits in well.  She always seems to have a way of speaking that is just on the edge of craziness yet clinical all at the same time.  This combination works well here as she is a Doctor who doesn't reveal all her secrets at once.

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the script as somethings left unexplained or underdeveloped.  The beginning offers a slow build, then the middle sucks the audience in but the third act is just lacking in action as well as leaving loose ends lying all over the place.  It is also a little too "convenient" how everything fits into place.  Of course, there is that Shyamalan twist that comes in at the end but in this case, it doesn't offer that much of an interesting point to make it all that worthwhile.  What it does though is leave the door slightly ajar for a possible fourth movie albeit with new characters.

Shyamalan does what we expect him to do with this film and it wraps up these storylines though I don't know if it was worth the 19-year wait.  Fans of Unbreakable will go to see it anyway and if you are unfamiliar with the first two films you should definitely see them before heading to the theater for Glass.

Grade: B-

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MPAA Rating: PG-13
Running Time: 128 minutes
Distributed By: Universal Pictures

For more information about Glass visit the FlickDirect Movie Database.


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